PUBLIC PROCUREMENT NEWS

  

NEWS SEARCH RESULTS ( 1 - 10 from 708 )

Binhai wins Chinese Public Procurement Award

15 January 2019

Tianjin Binhai New District won the 2018 China Government Procurement Award for innovation in green procurement. The Award recognizes their green furniture procurement evaluation system, which helps to assess and weigh environmental performance of bidding products on a large scale with full life cycle perspective.

In 2017, the Binhai Government Procurement Center pledged to advance green public procurement (GPP) by establishing a local green evaluation system. To this end, the Binhai Government Procurement Center joined the 10YFP SPP Working Group 1A “GPP Implementation and Impact Monitoring” as one of the East Asian pilot local governments - along with Suwon (Korea), Guiyang, Shenzhen Guangming District, Urumqi Economic and Technological Development Zone, and Tianjin Jizhou District (China).

Under the project, ICLEI East Asia worked closely with the Binhai Government Procurement Center and domestic partners, and identified the furniture sector as the entry point to pilot the green procurement evaluation scheme. ICLEI East Asia helped formulate a set of specifications, award criteria, and verification methods covering phases of raw materials extraction, design, manufacturing, assembling, transport, and end of life treatment. In June 2018, the Binhai Government Procurement Center applied the criteria to two tenders of procuring 6,160 sets of school desks and chairs for public campuses. From 2019 onwards, the district of Binhai is looking into issuing a local document to accelerate the adoption throughout the district.

Become Part of the Team: Vacancy at ICLEI

14 January 2019

The Sustainable Economy and Procurement team at ICLEI is looking to fill the position of Officer Sustainable Economy and Procurement at its European Secretariat in Freiburg (Germany).

ICLEI Sustainable Economy and Procurement team has been working on the topic of sustainable, strategic and innovation procurement for 22 years. In more recent years the team are also working on the topic of financing and sustainable local economies. The team support public authorities in implementation activities, spreading awareness of the concepts, developing new approaches, capacity building and encouraging policy developments at the European and international level.

This role has a topical focus on financing sustainable urban development and infrastructure. The new officer will be involved in the identification and delivery of a range of European projects. Working language is English and deadline for applications is January 19. The description of the position and information on how to apply can be found on the ICLEI jobs page.

ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability is an association of 1,200 local governments in 68 countries that are dedicated to sustainable development.

We are looking forward to your applications!

What is next for Sustainable and Innovation Procurement?

8 January 2019

The new year of 2019 brings new projects and new opportunities for Sustainable Public Procurement (SPP).

The circular economy is a key topic dominating the sustainability debate for years now. Public procurement has an important role to play in the transition toward more circularity. Ambitious local authorities are taking on the challenge to make their procurement more circular and 2019 will see the first results of their endeavours. To learn more about what communities are doing to implement a more circular economy check out the projects CircularPP as well as UrbanWINS  - and more projects coming up soon.

Social procurement goes beyond fair contracts for service providers. Ethical and fair trade needs to be assured along the entire supply chain. Implementing and monitoring fair supply chains and creating a commitment from all stakeholders is an important task for 2019. The Make ICT Fair project leads the way by involving local authorities in creating fair trade along the ICT supply chain.

More and more public authorities are seizing the opportunity to spark innovation through public tenders. Innovative products and services are the results of these. And cooperation among the public bodies is essential – it allows to implement good practices at a large scale and sends a powerful sign to the market for more innovation. Procure2Innovate and InnoBroker are two projects that show how Europe-wide cooperation among purchasing bodies can lead to innovation.

Sustainable and innovation procurement stretch beyond European borders. ICLEI offices globally have been working hard to support SPP and 2019 has promising global cooperation on the horizon. The Global Lead City Network on Sustainable Procurement – a network among leading cities in SPP - is developing a new and ambitious programme for the coming period.

The  Procura+ Awards 2019 reward outstanding sustainable and innovation procurement initiatives. Apply now and let your colleagues know about this opportunity.

For the New Year of 2019, we wish you all success with your sustainable, innovative, circular and strategic tenders. If you want to keep up to date with our work and key developments in sustainable and innovation procurement in 2019, subscribe to our newsletter here.



Resource Centre – your go-to online library for all things Procurement

27 December 2018

Want to learn more about green procurement? Eager to find a case study on sustainable food procurement? Curious about how the City of Rotterdam purchased charging stations for electric vehicles applying a joint procurement process? Need guidance on how to navigate procurement criteria on social responsibility?

Find the answers to those questions and more in our Resource Centre. With 850+ resources online it offers a wealth of knowledge in the field of public procurement. Browse through the reports, tools & guidance, case studies or projects. You can use the filter to search for instance for a specific topic or country.

We update the Resource Centre on a regular basis, making sure that you have access to the latest knowledge generated to advance sustainable, circular, strategic and innovation procurement worldwide.

Something missing? We are always looking for relevant resources to add to the Centre, please contact us at procurement@iclei.org if you have any suggestion.

Get started here!

New EU guidance for procuring greener road lighting

20 December 2018

On 10 December, the European Commission released new guidance for greening public procurement of road lighting equipment, covering new installations and retrofits. The guidance also covers traffic signals/lights. The recommendations are an update of the guidance developed a few years ago, and come in the form of practical criteria (EU GPP Criteria) which can be inserted into public calls for tender.

The environmental aspects covered by the new EU GPP criteria for road lighting are split into three areas: energy consumption, light pollution and lifetime. Procurement of traffic signals is considered separately, using criteria that are predominantly centred on life cycle costs. 1.3% of all electricity consumed in 2005 (by the EU25) was by road lighting installations - thus the use phase is the dominant impact category, according to life cycle assessment studies.

Complimenting the new guidance, a number of good practice cases from cities are available online, such as from Rotterdam (The Netherlands, Župa Dubrovačka (Croatia), and Jimena de la Frontera (Spain). More good practice examples are available from the website of the Premium Light Pro project. The new EU GPP Criteria will be available in all official EU languages in the coming months.

More information on the new guidance and other GPP related news can be found in the December edition of the GPP News Alert, a monthly newsletter providing news, good practice and stakeholder insights on GPP in the EU.

All EU GPP guidance can be found here.

Tackling climate change through Green Public Procurement (GPP)

18 December 2018

From electric buses to zero energy kindergartens, from recycled construction materials to organic catering services, city administrations worldwide are increasingly procuring innovative, low carbon solutions to help them deliver public services in the most sustainable way possible.

Globally, public procurement accounts for some 10-15% of GDP (WTO) - although this figure varies substantially according to country and market sector. This represents a huge degree of purchasing power, meaning that the procurement decisions which public administrations make can have a huge impact on the market – and help encourage that market to offer more sustainable goods and services.

A report by IFC (International Finance Corporation) analysed the potential for climate-smart investments across different sectors at city level. This highlights that almost all our purchasing actions have climate change impacts – whether this relates to the energy products consume, or CO2 emissions embedded in global supply chains. The most significant procurement sectors for cities include building and infrastructure construction/renovation, transportation (covering public fleets, public transportation services, as well as embedded transportation in the delivery of goods and services), food, energy, and energy consuming products. In all these sectors cities are helping to drive new technologies and solutions, by providing an invaluable launch market and helping suppliers achieve economies of scale.

Many cities across the globe – from Auckland to Tshwane, from Oslo to Seoul, from Buenos Aires to Montréal – are putting in place green or sustainable procurement strategies and policies aimed designed to harness the power of procurement to achieve a wide range of sustainability goals, such as climate change mitigation. The Global Lead City Network on Sustainable Procurement provides an international platform for cities to highlight their achievements and share their experiences.

Read the full report here.

GPP Project GreenS Finalist for Circular Economy Prize

13 December 2018

The City of Cadiz was nominated a finalist for the Spanish Local Good practices for the Climate Award, for their pilot-procurement "Green Electricity Supply for Cadiz Provincial Government", which was part of the European Project GreenS.

The Award is given by the Spanish Network of Cities for the Climate, and in its 7th edition recognized local good practices in six categories. The public recognition of forward thinking local authorities helps to promote climate action, mitigation and adaptation on a local level and beyond. The GreenS project in the city of Cadiz was a finalist in the Circular Economy category.

As part of the project, a new contract for electricity supply for public bodies in the City of Cadiz was awarded. The new contract meant a real breakthrough in the annual reduction of CO2 emissions, contributing to achieve government goals’ to combat climate change and ensure environmental protection. According to estimates, the project is saving 1.127 tons of CO2 emissions per year with no additional cost for the provincial administration.

The GreenS project was European project designed to focus the attention of public authorities to the Green Public Procurement (GPP), Life Cycle Cost of the products and Life Cycle Procurement analysis as part of their means to achieving the ambitious goals for exceeding the EU 20% CO2 reduction by 2020. The project concluded in the Summer of 2018.

To learn more about GreenS and Cadiz' procurement of green electricity head over to the project website.

 

To City and Urban Leaders: Seize this moment!

11 December 2018

If global CO2 emissions reach zero in thirty years, there is a one-in two chance of limiting warming to 1.5°C. If the world fails to meet the 1,5°C target, human and ecological systems will reach the limits of their adaptive capacity, triggering the disruption of basic economic activity. This was found in the recently published IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5° (SR1.5) highlighting the significance of the 1.5° threshold. Accomplishing the complex task of emission reduction requires tremendous changes in energy production and use, land use and ecosystems, urban and infrastructure, and industry.

The IPCC published a special Summary report for Urban Policy makers, because urban areas are a key player in climate change adaptation and mitigation.

The summary calls for engaged officials and stakeholders who can influence urban economies, urban form and infrastructure, the connectivity between urban and rural areas, and behavioural choices in support of the sustainable urban transition. This transition is also enabled by sharing knowledge, adapt and replicate experience of successful implementation through membership in international city networks such as ICLEI, Procura+, and GLCN.

Examples for solution approaches are also listed in the summary and range from:

·         Energy efficiency in buildings through for example design of zero carbon homes;

·         Further uptake of green infrastructure through nature-based solutions;

·         Sustainable urban design such as the compact city model and pedestrianisation of centres;

·         Industrial-urban symbiosis towards material recycling and reuse at the city-regional level;

·         Decentralized energy grid i.e. micro grids.

Projects like the EU project SPP regions have demonstrated that powerful tools such as innovation procurement of sustainable, low carbon solutions can reduce CO2 emissions significantly. It takes forward thinking officials to implement these practices in their cities and reach a zero carbon world.

Read the full Summary report for Urban Policy Makers here.

Catalan Regional Tender Results in Low Emission Vehicle Fleet

6 December 2018

“Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement could save about a million lives a year worldwide by 2050 through reductions in air pollution alone.” This is the main finding of a WHO report released this week at the occasion of the COP24 currently taking place in Katowice (Poland). One of the most dangerous and costly public health threats, air pollution in urban areas is one of the top policy priorities in the EU and worldwide.

Cities themselves can be part of the solution by purchasing low emission vehicles. Only a year ago the fleet for service and police vehicles of the Catalan Association of Towns and Counties consisted of 95% diesel vehicles, which contribute significantly to poor air quality. Thanks to a new framework agreement awarded in 2018, 308 new vehicles were purchased, over 80% of which are low or zero emission vehicles.

The call for tender for the new framework contract was developed as part of the European project SPP regions, which promoted the creation and expansion of European regional networks of municipalities working together on sustainable public procurement (SPP) and procurement of innovation. Collaboration among the public bodies sends a stronger signal of demand for sustainability and innovation to suppliers and help local authorities achieve ambitious sustainability targets.

Read the full case study here.

More inspiring examples of how public procurement can promote health and air quality can be found in our Resource Centre.

At the cross-roads: take the right turn towards electric buses

4 December 2018

This week, all eyes are on Katowice (Poland) and the Climate Change Conference COP24, where countries have to agree on how they will achieve the the goal of minimizing climate change to less than 2°C warming, decided three years earlier at COP21 in Paris. In his opening address Antonio Guterres (UN Secretary-General) highlights which steps need to be taken immediately to get closer to reaching this goal – one of them is the electrification of transport, which accounts for a large share of greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to dangerously poor air quality in cities.

A new report titled “Electric buses arrive on time“ (Transport & Environment), examines the transition towards sustainable, low carbon transport through public procurement. It maps out the shift from diesel powered to electric busses in Europe. “In 2017, the number of electric bus orders more than doubled - from 400 in 2016 to more than 1,000. In 2018, the market share is estimated to be around 9%, marking the transition from niche to mainstream and the beginning of a steep and necessary uptake curve.”

Electric buses already offer a better total cost of ownership (TCO) than diesel buses when external (public health) costs are included. Beyond costs, electric buses offer many additional benefits compared to their fossil fueled counterparts: superior image and comfort, no stranded assets from investing in gas infrastructure, using locally produced (renewable) energy and ensuring energy sovereignty by replacing oil consumption.

The earlier cities transition to a zero emission bus fleet, the better.

However, there are challenges to implementation, for instance coping with the higher capital costs of zero-emissions buses. Lucien Mathieu, author of the report and transport and e-mobility analyst at T&E, has a solution for that, too: “a grant could be made available through the new EU budget from 2020. This should be complemented by a Europe-wide zero emission sales target for new buses.”(Euroactiv)

For inspirational examples of zero emission public procurement, visits the website of ICLEI led European project BuyZET, in which cities use procurement of innovative solutions for zero emission urban delivery of goods and services.

For more case studies on the topic of clean urban transport, head over to our resource centre.